Drone Technology: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Teaching

November 8, 2017
11:45am – 12:45pm
Discovery Bar @ Cabot Science Library, Harvard Science Center

Please join us for the third event in the Digital Futures Discovery Series, a year-long program led by Harvard’s Digital Futures Consortium that explores the ongoing transformation of scholarship through innovative technology. Anas Chalah will present Drone Technology: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Teaching.

Advance environmental engineering research using drone technology has informed our undergraduate design-based education at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University. Dr. Chalah will shed light on how a summer program was designed in the summer 2017 to educate high school students on design thinking, system and system control by using drones as the main educational tool.

Following the presentation, please join us in sharing your ideas and questions. We look forward to meeting you.

Anas Chalah is the Assistant Dean for Teaching and Learning at the John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) at Harvard University, overseeing undergraduate active learning laboratories, and mechanical and electronic student machine shops. Chalah is a member of the SEAS executive research and teaching team, and a lecturer on engineering sciences. He is an active member of Harvard’s Teaching and Learning Consortium, which provides policy recommendations on substantive issues of teaching and learning as well as academic strategic planning.


Visual Eloquence: A Hands-On Workshop for Creating Effective Data Visualizations

November 7 or 8, 2017
4:00pm – 6:00pm
Lamont Library B-30 Collaborative Learning Space

Join the Digital Futures Consortium for a participatory workshop on visualizing data and understanding the powerful role it plays in analysis and presentation for digital scholarship. The workshop will feature brief presentations, a hands-on exercise working with a dataset to create a visual presentation, and a discussion followed by pizza. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own data projects or challenges for an open lab session afterward. No programming or data expertise is necessary.

Registration is free: http://hvd.li/viselo/


Project Phaedra: Preserving Harvard's Early Data and Research in Astronomy

October 4, 2017
11:45am – 12:45pm
Discovery Bar @ Cabot Science Library, Harvard Science Center

Please join us for the second event in the Digital Futures Discovery Series, a year-long program led by Harvard’s Digital Futures Consortium that explores the ongoing transformation of scholarship through innovative technology. Daina Bouquin will discuss Project Phaedra: Preserving Harvard’s Early Data and Research in Astronomy.

Material originally produced during 19th and early 20th century by researchers at the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) was recently re-discovered in the HCO Astronomical Plate Stacks collection. This material helps represent the history of the HCO and acts as an irreplaceable primary source on the evolution of observation methods and astronomy as a science.

The material is also relevant to the history of women in science as the collection contains logbooks and notebooks produced by the Harvard Computers, women who have come back into the spotlight due to the recent release of books like “The Glass Universe,” “Rise of the Rocket Girls,” and movies like “Hidden Figures”.

To ensure that this remarkable set of items is as accessible and useful as possible Wolbach Library, in collaboration with many partners, is working to catalog, digitize, and preserve the entire collection. And here’s where you can help! The material also needs to be transcribed by volunteers through the Smithsonian Transcription Center in DC. This will allow the collection to be full-text searchable in the NASA Astrophysics Data System and for the notebooks to be linked to their original source material: 500,000 glass plate photographs representing the first ever picture of the visible universe.

More info:
Project PHaEDRA
Smithsonian Transcription Center PHaEDRA notebooks
PHaEDRA Finding Aid on OASIS
SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System
Harvard College Observatory Plate Stacks
PHaEDRA on Twitter
PHaEDRA on Instagram

Following the presentation, please join us in sharing your ideas and questions. We look forward to meeting you.

Daina Bouquin is the Head Librarian of Wolbach Library at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. At the CfA, Daina’s work focuses primarily on lowering social and technical barriers that impact the astronomy community’s ability to create and share new knowledge. Some of her specific topics of interest include open science, research software preservation, data visualization, machine learning, and the history of science


All About Digital Futures

September 12, 2017
11:45am – 12:45pm
Discovery Bar @ Cabot Science Library, Harvard Science Center

Join us for the kickoff of the Digital Futures Discovery Series, a year-long program led by Harvard’s Digital Futures Consortium that explores the ongoing transformation of scholarship through innovative technology.

There will be brief lightning talks on both past and planned events, including:

An Overview of the Digital Futures Consortium (2013-2017)
Marty Schreiner, Director of Maps, Media, Data, and Government Information; Librarian of Lamont Library

Thinking With Your Eyes: Visualizing the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences (2014)
Jeff Emanuel, Associate Director of Academic Technology and CHS Fellow in Aegean Archaeology and Prehistory

Visual Eloquence (2016-2017)
Hugh Treslow, Head of Social Sciences and Visualization for Maps, Media, Data and Government Information; Librarian for the Fung Library

Art, Tech, Psyche at Arts @ 29 Garden St (2015-2017)
Susan Berstler, Technology Specialist for Libraries, Cabot Science Library

Sightlines: Imaging and Technology for Cultural Heritage Collections (2015-2016)
Adam Kellie, Specialized Imaging Services, Harvard University Library

Following the lightning talks, please join us in sharing your ideas and questions. We look forward to meeting you.


ArtTechPsyche III

April 20, 2017
6 – 9 pm
Arts @ 29 Garden

Art Technology Psyche celebrates human expression at the intersection of technology and the arts. Harvard Digital Arts and Humanities (DARTH), in collaboration with the Harvard Library and the Digital Futures Consortium, invites you to participate in a day of immersive digital experiences, art exhibitions, technology demos, and visionary speakers on Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Arts @ 29 Garden.

Explore the creative process and its impact on emerging technologies. Discover the ways in which technology shapes us, and conversely, how the artist continually challenges and informs technological development. Interact with cutting edge art installations and software demos to experience the world in new ways. Meet like-minded faculty, staff, students, researchers, and colleagues of any skill level while exploring new projects and collaborations on and around campus.


Visual Eloquence: A Hands-on Workshop for Creating Effective Data Visualizations

November 2, 2016
4:00pm – 6:30pm
Lamont Library B-30 Collaborative Learning Space

Join the Digital Futures Consortium for a participatory workshop to gain practical experience visualizing data and understanding the powerful role it plays in contemporary digital scholarship. The workshop will feature brief presentations, a hands-on exercise creating a data-driven narrative, and a discussion followed by pizza. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own data projects or challenges for an open lab session afterward. No programming expertise is necessary. Co-presented by Harvard Library, Harvard University Arts & Humanities Research Computing, and Digital History at Harvard.

RSVP: http://hvd.li/viselo


ArtTechPsyche II

April 14, 2016
Arts @ 29 Garden

Art Technology Psyche celebrates human expression at the intersection of technology and the arts. Harvard Digital Arts and Humanities (DARTH), in collaboration with the Harvard Library and the Digital Futures Consortium, invites you to participate in a day of immersive digital experiences, art exhibitions, technology demos, and visionary speakers on Thursday, April 14, 2016 at Arts @ 29 Garden.

Explore the creative process and its impact on emerging technologies. Discover the ways in which technology shapes us, and conversely, how the artist continually challenges and informs technological development. Interact with cutting edge art installations and software demos to experience the world in new ways. Meet like-minded faculty, staff, students, researchers, and colleagues of any skill level while exploring new projects and collaborations on and around campus.


Sightlines: proJECT

February 11, 2016
2:00pm – 4:00pm
Forum Room, Lamont Library, 11 Quincy Street

PREPARE – DISCOVER – INTERACT

proJECT provided a glimpse into the near future of technical and interactive imagery of cultural heritage materials. Presentations and demonstrations encouraged innovative use and development of these technologies for use in conservation, education, recreation, and immersive environments with augmented, virtual, and mixed reality.

PEOPLE

Judith is a 2nd year graduate student in the Fluid Interfaces Group at the MIT Media Lab. Her main area of research focuses on Human Computer Interaction with the aim of making the user experience more seamless, natural and integrated in our physical lives. Her goal is to design and develop novel form factors that leverage the full range of sensory capabilities and control modalities of the user. Before joining MIT she graduated as a Multimedia Engineer and worked as a UX Researcher at URL Barcelona. She worked at Microsoft Research and developed interactive prototypes in the areas of mixed and virtual reality. She has explored the use of wearable devices such as head-mounted displays and wearable fashion to create solutions that more naturally extend our minds, bodies and behavior. Judith’s work has been published in top HCI conferences and featured by press such CNN, The New York Times, Fast Company, The Creators Project and The Times.

Xavier is a second year Master student at the Fluid Interfaces Group at the MIT Media Lab. His research focuses on exploring novel interactions between users and objects through the design and implementation of software and hardware prototypes. He is specially interested in HCI, UX Design, IoT, wearable devices, AR and VR. His work has been featured in several international conferences and media such as New York Times, MIT Tech Review and CNN. Before joining the Fluid Interfaces Group, he graduated in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Ramon Llull University (Barcelona).

Kate Smith is Associate Paintings Conservator at the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at the Harvard Art Museums. Kate received her B.A. in art history from Smith College in 1994 and her Master of Arts in paintings conservation from Buffalo State College in 2001. Until 2008, she was assistant conservator at the Straus Center, focusing on the conservation of the mural cycles at the Boston Public Library. Kate held assistant conservator positions at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, for Gianfranco Pocobene Studio, and at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, before returning to the Harvard Art Museums in 2011, where she specializes in the technical examination of paintings.

Rus Gant is a well-regarded international 3D artist, computer engineer and educator. Currently on the Research staff at Harvard University and the teaching faculty at Tokyo’s Showa Women’s University he is currently pursuing work in the future of real-time 3D computer graphics and virtual reality. He is currently the Lead Technical artist for the Giza 3D project at Harvard reconstructing the pyramids, temples and tombs on the Giza Plateau in Egypt in virtual reality. For more than 40 years he has applied his visualization skills to work in computer science, archaeology and museology for some of the world’s leading museums and universities. As a computer hardware and software engineer he has constantly been at the forefront of the science of computer visualization. As a Fellow at the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies and as a Fellow at the Center for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University he has created and developed new techniques in 3D graphics, multimedia computing, virtual reality and digital archaeology. These techniques have often been applied to the reconstruction of the art and architecture of ancient cultures. As a teacher and lecturer he has often brought his wide-ranging expertise in the real world to the university classroom, museums and art galleries. At institutions like MIT, Carnegie Mellon, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, The British Museum and now Tokyo’s Showa Women’s University he has both taught new technology, art and culture and used his technological expertise in advancing the craft of teaching.

Suzanne Wones is the Director of Library Digital Strategies and Innovations for Harvard Library. In this role, she leads the development and implementation of digital strategies for the Harvard Library community by extending Harvard Library’s reach in data management and visualization. She works to identify and examine trends in information technology and digital library development in coordination with multiple departments spanning the Library and Harvard University Information Technology.
In her fifteen years at Harvard, she has held positions as Executive Director, and as Assistant Director for Research, Curriculum, and Publication Support of the Harvard Law School Library, Head of Access and Research Services, and a Senior Reference Librarian at the John F. Kennedy School of Government Library, among others. She holds a MS in Information, Library and Information Services from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, as well as a MA in American History from the University of New Hampshire and a BA in History from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.


Sightlines: obJECT

December 3, 2015
3:00pm – 5:00pm
Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St.

PRESERVE – USE – ENGAGE

obJECT examined contemporary use and the impact of emerging technologies on technical imagery in humanities studies. Use of 2D and 3D imagery of cultural heritage materials, and the innate data of these digital objects, extends to artists, scientists, historians, and wide-ranging examinations that all derive different, valuable insights. Presenters and panelists for this event included experts in multispectral imaging projects, art conservation, gamification as an educational tool, and data visualization.

PEOPLE

Elizabeth Goins is an Associate Professor in the Department of Performing Arts & Visual Culture at Rochester Institute of Technology. She is the primary liaison with the RIT MAGIC Center’s Museum and Technology Initiative. (http://magic.rit.edu/projects/mgti.html) The MAGIC (Media Arts Games Interaction Creativity) Center’s mission is to lead higher education in the exploration, experimentation, design, development, and deployment of interactive, experimental, expressive and social media. Projects connected to the Museum initiative explore ways interactivity with museum collections, create games to change the way that visitors interact with the collection, and improve understanding of cultural heritage collections via digitally augmented experiences. She has recently developed The Garden, which explores the symbolism of Jheronimus Bosch through gameplay.

Gregory Heyworth is an Associate Professor of English and Digital Humanities at the University of Mississippi. After taking a BA in English from Cambridge and a Ph.D. from Princeton in Comparative Literature, Gregory Heyworth began his career at the University of Mississippi as a medievalist with a specialty in textual studies and classical influence. His first book, Desiring Bodies: Ovidian Romance and the Cult of Form (Notre Dame, 2009), won the 2010 Choice Oustanding Academic Title award. His interest in textual science and digital humanities began with his edition of the badly damaged Old French poem Les Eschez d’Amours (Brill, 2013) which he recovered using a transportable multispectral imaging system he developed with a grant from the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training. In 2010, Heyworth founded and now directs the Lazarus Project (http://www.lazarusprojectimaging.com/), a non-profit initiative to recover damaged cultural hertitage objects using various imaging technologies. Since its inception, the Lazarus Project has digitally restored scores of damaged works and objects in libraries and collections around the world, including the Vercelli Book and the Martellus Map; it has supported the research of numerous scholars by offering its technology and expertise, and has launched major multispectral digitization projects in Chartres, Tblisi, and Vercelli. Behind the Lazarus Project is a curriculum in textual science that Heyworth developed to train students in a combination of the history of the book, codicology, and spectral imaging, imaging science, and digital display. He is currently working on an edition of the oldest translation of the Gospels into Latin, a book entitled Textual Science and the Future of the Past with Roger Easton, and a promising neural net approach to manuscript OCR.

Ron Spronk is a professor of Art History with a special interest in painting materials and techniques. He studies the genesis of easel paintings (from Van Eyck to Mondrian) with techniques such as infrared reflectography and X-radiography. Originally from the Netherlands, he moved to the USA in 1993 to start work towards his Ph.D. at Indiana University, Bloomington. Before coming to Queen’s in 2007, he worked at the Harvard Art Museums for 13 years where he undertook several interdisciplinary research and exhibition projects, closely collaborating with other art historians, conservators and conservation scientists. Among his many publications are two award-winning books: Mondrian: The Transatlantic Paintings (with Harry Cooper) was awarded the 2002 College Art Association/Heritage Preservation Joint Award for Distinction in Scholarship and Conservation, and Prayers and Portraits, Unfolding the Netherlandish Diptych (with John Hand and Cathy Metzger) received the 2007 George Wittenborn Memorial Book Award from the Art Libraries Society of North America. In addition to his professorship at Queen’s, Ron Spronk also holds the Jheronimus Bosch Chair at Radboud University in Nijmegen, the Netherlands. He is currently participating in the Bosch Research and Conservation Project (http://boschproject.org/), which will result in a major exhibition in ‘s-Hertogenbosch in 2016 and in a new monograph on this enigmatic artist. He is also closely involved in the current conservation/restoration treatment of the Ghent Altarpiece, for which he coordinated the innovative on-line research tool Closer to Van Eyck. At Queen’s, he is currently establishing QU-MoLTAH, a mobile laboratory for technical art history. With this facility, small groups of graduate students will be performing technical examinations in museums in Ontario and beyond.

Jeff Steward is the Director of Digital Infrastructure and Emerging Technology (DIET) at the Harvard Art Museums. For the past 17 years he has worked at museums with museum data. He provides leadership and guidance on the use of a wide range of technologies at the museums to reshape the museum experience inside and out. Some of his work is found at https://vimeo.com/channels/705959.

Brenda Bernier is the James Needham Chief Conservator and Head of the Weissman Preservation Center at Harvard Library, where she has served for eight years as the senior photograph conservator. She is active in the field, serving on local and national committees, teaching workshops, and presenting new research. Brenda’s conservation and preservation experience has been shaped by working in such diverse institutions as the National Archives and Records Administration, the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, and the Baltimore Museum of Art. She has a master’s degree in photograph conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and a B.A. in Art History from Virginia Commonwealth University.


Memories Realized: From Objects and Media to Curation and Scholarship

November 10, 2015
5:00pm – 7:00pm
Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall

Memory, events, and personal objects are the focus of research in many disciplines and at the same time they document cultural and social history. Scholars produce online archives from this work that include film, still images, and documents, adding to scholarly resources available for further research. This panel session will describe the sometimes complicated process by which cultural heritage data enters digital archives, and in particular, how people’s memories become data.